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White Paper Data Governance - Why is Data Governance so strategic in 2023 and how can a CDP support your program?

Month: July 2018

The CDP is gradually taking over the DMP. Revolution or evolution? Find out here

As has happened many times before in the innovative world of digital marketing, it would appear that the arrival of CDP marks the end of the DMP. But is this a revolution, or rather an evolution? Let’s look at 5 major reconciliations made possible by the CDP to find out.

#1 Reconciliation of activations

Historically, the DMP (Data Management Platform) concept emerged in the wake of the DSP (Demand Side Platform). So much so that in 2015, some were asking why the two different platforms even existed? In reality, their roles are rather distinct: the DMP collects data originating from advertisers’ digital environments, segments audiences (anonymous profiles created by cookies) and feeds the DSP, trading desks and other relevant tools to optimise media buying.

The original purpose of the DMP was thus fundamentally advertising orientated. However, it has since considerably evolved, widening its scope to include web personalisation, emailing, social media retargeting and telemarketing. The purpose is to offer the largest possible range of activations to cover the entire lead and customer journey. And that’s exactly what the CDP (Customer Data Platform) aims to enrich: instead of simply gathering and refining marketing data to optimise media buying, it now makes audiences the centre of its attention.

#2 Reconciliation of channels

As its name suggests, the DMP was born in the digital era. But we are in 2018, where the digital world is no longer seen as an isolated island but one part of a larger entity: the omni-channel journey. All the studies confirm it: the ROPO Observatory found that 31% of website visitors follow up with an in-store purchase, and according to Fevad, 29% of online buyers also bought other products when they went to pick up their order. Evidently, omni-channel is not just marketing fantasy, but a tangible reality that solutions must take into account.

That is why the DMP, initially focused on media buying and the digital world, is embracing the offline world to provide end-to-end scenarios. Examples include analysing online behaviour to identify a visitor who intends to close their account and then triggering a call from the retention team; or managing omni-channel performance to increase Customer Lifetime Value. This omni-channel DMP is the CDP.

#3 Reconciliation of data types

A comparison between the DMP and CRM has often been made to explain the DMP’s place in the famous MarTech stack. It often highlights the fact that one (the DMP) is fed with anonymous digital data while the other (the CRM) processes nominative data relating to all online and offline interactions. And although, at one time, the DMP followed a strictly cookie-only diet, the arrival of omni-channel brought with it the need for personalisation. The Media DMP thus gave way to a Marketing CDP, often connected to the CRM.

Consequently, while the CDP and CRM still have their differences, it’s no longer the nature of the data processed that divides them, since the CDP can now handle nominative data. But should it store this data? If so, what measures should be taken, especially vis-à-vis the GDPR? These questions are unavoidable. Nevertheless, the CDP’s scope now goes far beyond anonymous data, although it sill remains connected to the DMP’s AdTech universe. And it’s this evolution that heralds the advent of the CDP.

#4 Reconciliation of data sources

In keeping with their media focus, the DMP was originally designed to leverage third-party data. And in this regard, the game has also changed. Companies have become conscious of their excessive dependence on third parties (GAFA and its walled gardens), consequently expanding their data and augmenting their CRM Onboarding to maximise synergy between cookies and emails.

Since personal data regulations stipulate greater care when merging files, due to the lack of transparency with some third-party data, businesses are looking to better exploit their own, first-party data. Another option being explored is collaborative CRM Onboarding, whereby several companies pool their data. To do so, the marketing data management platform must incorporate a matching engine. Another way that the CDP differentiates itself from the DMP.

#5 Reconciliation of teams

Customer retention teams have the CRM; acquisition teams have the DMP. In many marketing departments, the rift between the two solutions often has organisational repercussions. This greatly heeds the ability to construct coherent segmentation and activation strategies throughout the conversion tunnel and beyond to retention.

In an increasingly omni-channel world, with growing importance paid to personalising a lead/customer’s journey, the lines have already moved. Can the CDP help synergise efforts even further? It certainly intends to, which is something the Media DMP could never hope to achieve. While it may not revolutionise the DMP, the CDP signifies a substantial evolution for these platforms that are in the process of becoming the new hubs for marketing data.

GDPR et Tag Management peuvent-ils faire bon ménage ?

Can the GDPR and Tag Management work in harmony?

“How can you prepare yourself for the GDPR without becoming blind; in other words, without losing the analysis data for your digital audiences?” That is the major worry currently preoccupying digital marketing teams. Since the GDPR sets out an entirely new order for managing personal data, companies must adopt new consent practices. Consequently, the entire tag management process must likely be revamped, including tag activation and the corresponding services (tracking analytics, retargeting, personalisation, etc.).

(EXTRACT OF THE WHITE PAPER ON HOW TO ENSURE YOUR DMP IS GDPR COMPLIANT )
What is consent?
The concept is very clearly defined. Consent must be obtained in a way that is totally unambiguous. To obtain consent, you must clearly and explicitly explain to each person why you are processing their data. Furthermore, for it to be considered as freely given, the consent must constitute a genuine choice (and not an obligation). This means they must be able to access the service even if they refuse to give their consent.
LEARN MORE> DOWNLOAD THE WHITE PAPER

These new practices raise 3 questions:

  • How can you make obtaining consent as simple as possible?
  • How can you minimise the time between obtaining consent and tracking reactivation?
  • How can you streamline tag management in the long term?

Everyone is still looking for the perfect formula to obtain consent. It can sometimes be tough to find the right image or words to explain in a clear and informative manner the purpose of the service without losing their interest. In an ideal world, you would use A/B testing to compare the success of different messages. However, for many companies, with just a few weeks before the GDPR comes into force, time is running out.

Technical challenge: how do you reactivate tags straight after obtaining consent?

Once consent is obtained, another challenge emerges: how can you reactivate tags as soon as possible and preferably before the user begins any other interactions? The only way to minimise this delay is to directly connect the consent banner to tag management, which requires a TMS (Tag Management System) also capable of managing consent. In the case of TagCommander, Commanders Act’s TMS, this falls under the remit of the specialised ePrivacy module.

This module can directly link consent for a specific purpose, for example analytics tracking, to the corresponding services and tags. Therefore, as soon as a user gives their permission, and before their next interaction, the tag container is immediately reloaded and the relevant tags activated.

And what if your TMS isn’t capable of handling privacy issues? In this case, the solution is to add lines of code for each tag to check consent has been obtained and handle activation accordingly. Such work, given the sheer number of tags involved (Commanders Act’s clients have on average 16 tags per page), soon becomes a chore and will be extremely labourious to maintain in the long run.

GDPR: an opportunity to streamline tags

This agile management of tags heralded by the GDPR does not only require the right equipment, but also a lot of mapping beforehand. The aim is to organise tags based on their purpose — so you can request the correct consent — and carry out a spring clean. During these ‘inventories’, it’s not uncommon to come across ‘forgotten’ tags, activated for partnerships that no longer exist but…which continue to transfer data.

This investigative work is also a chance to go even further and consider second-level tags. These tags are often a source of data leaks to unidentified third-parties. Once again, the TMS can prove to be vital as it can re-establish the tag hierarchy and allow for any interlopers to be deactivated. This is exactly what TagCommander does via its TagFirewall feature, which uses lists (white and blacklist) to identify authorised and unauthorised tags.

(EXTRACT OF THE WHITE PAPER ON HOW TO ENSURE YOUR DMP IS GDPR COMPLIANT)
Second-level tags?
As their name suggests, these tags are called by the main tags activated on a website. An example would be an advertising or testing tag that requests other tags to help provide the service. Therefore, one type of tag, for which a user has given their consent, may call upon a second-level tag that the original site cannot directly access, and therefore lacks the necessary consent.
LEARN MORE > DOWNLOAD THE WHITE PAPER

As marketing teams undertake measures to comply with the GDPR, which at first sight may seem like a hindrance, it becomes clear that ‘Less is Better’. A change that bears a striking resemblance to that of mass emailing, whereby after a fervent start (with a saturation of audiences), stakeholders adopted wiser and more simple practices. For tag management, this translates into only implementing tags that are truly useful for providing and managing the service, since over-collecting is clearly counterproductive. Could the GDPR be seen as an opportunity? It doesn’t seem too far-fetched…

De la DMP à la CDP : 5 grandes réconciliations

From DMP to CDP: 5 major reconciliations

As has happened many times before in the innovative world of digital marketing, it would appear that the arrival of CDP marks the end of the DMP. But is this a revolution, or rather an evolution? Let’s look at 5 major reconciliations made possible by the CDP to find out.

#1 Reconciliation of activations

Historically, the DMP (Data Management Platform) concept emerged in the wake of the DSP (Demand Side Platform). So much so that in 2015, some were asking why the two different platforms even existed? In reality, their roles are rather distinct: the DMP collects data originating from advertisers’ digital environments, segments audiences (anonymous profiles created by cookies) and feeds the DSP, trading desks and other relevant tools to optimise media buying.

The original purpose of the DMP was thus fundamentally advertising orientated. However, it has since considerably evolved, widening its scope to include web personalisation, emailing, social media retargeting and telemarketing. The purpose is to offer the largest possible range of activations to cover the entire lead and customer journey. And that’s exactly what the CDP (Customer Data Platform) aims to enrich: instead of simply gathering and refining marketing data to optimise media buying, it now makes audiences the centre of its attention.

#2 Reconciliation of channels

As its name suggests, the DMP was born in the digital era. But we are in 2018, where the digital world is no longer seen as an isolated island but one part of a larger entity: the omni-channel journey. All the studies confirm it: the ROPO Observatory found that 31% of website visitors follow up with an in-store purchase, and according to Fevad, 29% of online buyers also bought other products when they went to pick up their order. Evidently, omni-channel is not just marketing fantasy, but a tangible reality that must be addressed by solutions.

That is why the DMP, initially focused on media buying and the digital world, is embracing the offline world to provide end-to-end scenarios. One example is Crédit Mutuel Nord Europe, which analyses web behaviour to identify a visitor who intends to close their account and then triggers a call from their retention team. Or women’s fashion brand Promod, which uses it to manage omni-channel performance and increases Customer Lifetime Value. This omni-channel DMP is the CDP.

#3 Reconciliation of data types

A comparison between the DMP and CRM has often been made to explain the DMP’s place in the famous MarTech stack. It often highlights the fact that one (the DMP) is fed with anonymous digital data while the other (the CRM) processes nominative data relating to all online and offline interactions. And although, at one time, the DMP followed a strictly cookie-only diet, the arrival of omni-channel brought with it the need for personalisation. The Media DMP thus gave way to a Marketing DMP, often connected to the CRM.

Consequently, while the DMP and CRM still have their differences, it’s no longer the nature of the data processed that divides them, since the DMP can now handle nominative data. But should it store this data? If so, what measures should be taken, especially vis-à-vis the GDPR? These questions are unavoidable. Nevertheless, the DMP’s scope now goes far beyond anonymous data. And it’s this evolution that heralds the advent of the CDP.

#4 Reconciliation of data sources

In keeping with their media focus, the DMP was originally designed to leverage third-party data. And in this regard, the game has also changed. Companies have become conscious of their excessive dependence on third parties (GAFA and its walled gardens), consequently expanding their data and augmenting their CRM Onboarding to maximise synergy between cookies and emails.

Since personal data regulations stipulate greater care when merging files, due to the lack of transparency with some third-party data, businesses are looking to better exploit their own, first-party data. Another option being explored is collaborative CRM Onboarding, whereby several companies pool their data. To do so, the marketing data management platform must incorporate a matching engine. Another way that the CDP differentiates itself from the DMP.

#5 Reconciliation of teams

Customer retention teams have the CRM; acquisition teams have the DMP. In many marketing departments, the rift between the two solutions often has organisational repercussions. This greatly heeds the ability to construct coherent segmentation and activation strategies throughout the conversion tunnel and beyond to retention.

In an increasingly omni-channel world, with growing importance paid to personalising a lead/customer’s journey, the lines have already moved. Can the CDP help synergise efforts even further? It certainly intends to, which is something the Media DMP could never hope to achieve. While it may not revolutionise the DMP, the CDP signifies a substantial evolution for these platforms that are in the process of becoming the new hubs for marketing data.

How can you orchestrate your marketing based around people — and not cookies? Read our white paper to learn how a CDP can help you in the omni-channel era.
WANT TO LEARN MORE? DOWNLOAD THE WHITEPAPER

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